Onion compound linked to lower blood pressure

A new study, published in the Journal of Nutrition (November 2007, Volume 137, Pages 2405-2411) titled “Quercetin Reduces Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Subjects”, is said to be the first to report the blood pressure-lowering activity of this flavonol. The study found that a supplement of quercetin (naturally occurring component of onion) led to significant reductions in the blood pressure of 22 people with high blood pressure.

Red Onions contain quercetin a flavonol found to lower high blood pressure

The randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, considered to be the gold-standard for experimental interventions, adds to an ever-growing body of reported health benefits for quercetin. The flavonol was previously linked to reduced risk of certain cancers. Building on science from animal studies reporting a potential hypotensive (blood pressure lowering) role for the flavonol, researchers from the University of Utah recruited 19 men and women with pre-hypertension (average BP 137/86 mmHg) and 22 hypertensives (average BP 148/96 mmHg). The subjects were randomly assigned to receive a daily supplement of quercetin or a placebo for 28 days. Lead author Randi Edwards and co-workers report that the hypertensives receiving the quercetin supplement experienced reductions in systolic and diastolic BP of 7 and 5 mmHg, respectively, compared to placebo. No BP changes were observed in the pre-hypertensives as a result of either intervention.

Specific whole foods of the allium family such as onions and garlic have a long history of being associated with cardiovascular benefits. This new evidence further clarifies one way onions support heart health by working to lower elevated blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.

=======================================================

Do you like this article? You could learn more about important nutrients that help keep our blood pressure normal by visiting our site “Nutrients that keep blood pressure normal”. Just click HERE.

Advertisements

About Nutrients that keep blood pressure normal

In an effort to draw attention to the dramatic increases in chronic disease world-wide, the World Health Organization (WHO) in its report, “Preventing Chronic Disease - A Vital Investment”, pointed that chronic disease, world-wide, is increasing faster than the rate of population growth! In 2005, 60% of all deaths, about 35 million, were attributed to chronic disease. By 2015, they expect that number to rise by 17% to 41 million! One of these chronic diseases is cardiovascular disease - a disease linked to high blood pressure, which the WHO reports kills an estimated 17 million people worldwide every year. At the root of this problem is poor nutrition. Many people are just not consuming foods with sufficient levels of nutrients capable of helping our bodies fight off diseases and keep us healthy. As a way to help people improve their diet and reduce incidences of chronic diseases (particularly those linked to high blood pressure), we decided to write this blog in an attempt to highlight nutrients that are important in maintaining normal blood pressure levels. We have also included research findings to back our claims. Also featured are dietary supplements that contain the essential nutrients in much higher levels than those found in ordinary food for best results. Feel free to leave your comments or contact us in case you have any queries. Also kindly support our cause by buying any of the featured dietary supplements.
This entry was posted in Health and Nutrition and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s